sábado, 18 de noviembre de 2017

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Vínculo original en TechnologyReview (Web)
Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Última actualización:

martes, 27 de diciembre de 2011

Entrada en el observatorio:

martes, 27 de diciembre de 2011

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Inglés


The Internet's Perilous New Year's Resolution

Antipiracy legislation headed for a U.S. Senate vote in January could be fraught with downsides.

Internet legislation that is scheduled for a vote in the U.S. Senate next month would aim to stop the unlicensed downloading of billions of dollars' worth of movies and music—as well as the trade in counterfeit drugs and other goods—by blocking access to certain websites, many of them registered abroad. But its basic strategies could lead to trouble on several fronts.

For one thing, the crackdown may unintentionally weaken Internet security. That is because the legislation could let courts order Internet service providers, search engines, domain-name servers and others to block Web addresses or send people to addresses other than the ones they typed or clicked. That trick, called redirection, is just the kind thing security engineers want to stamp out, because it's also a key tool for committing Internet fraud.

For another, song and movie traders will always be able to use widely available circumvention tools—such as Tor, a technology funded and developed by the U.S. government itself—to get around blocks and reach the desired sites. If passed, the legislation may achieve little more than an ineffectual antipiracy law recently enacted in France, which has been bogged down by its complexity and costs.

Under the Protect IP Act, government prosecutors or copyright holders could seek a court order finding that a website was "dedicated to infringing activities." With such a finding, a court could order those sites blocked so as to prevent people who click the relevant links or type their domain names into a browser from actually reaching them. (Instead, the user might be redirected to a warning page.) The Senate bill is scheduled for a January 24 vote. A similar House bill, called the Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA, is still in the Judiciary Committee.